queersChOOL!

quality gay fiction about gay teenage boys at school and away from school

Sealing our Fate by Josh

It was not so long ago I read and reviewed Book Worms by the same author, and this story once again reminds at how wonderfully romantic Josh writes about sex and love.

Two boys and the perfect summer in together and for the most part alone in a fishing shack on the coast.

Beautiful descriptions, a lovely pair of main characters and graphic descriptions of their love make this a heady and compelling read.

Read it at awesomedude

Escaping the Pain by Cia

Twenty one chapters and an epilogue follow the life of Dane from the day of his mother's death for a few weeks. Dane's life is one of being loathed and abused by his father, loathing and abuse Dane seems to have accepted, but then he meets Tap.

There is plenty of serious writing in this story, and some of the early scenes brought a tear or two to my eye.  The story of an escape from bullying and the re-discovery of trust in a friend is warm and exciting.

Read it at ga

Mountain Magic by Sequoyah

This is actually the stories of several gay youths and how their paths all meet in the mountain town of Coldsprings, as told by one of them, 16 year old Douglas.  All the boys in the story are in need of some love and care to help them discover themselves and a little more about what is important in the world and the backdrop of the mountains and the American Indian heritage that some of them share rovides.

At thirty eight chapters, this is a lengthy read, but the writing is good and the characters varied enough and interesting enough to fill the pages.  Sequoyah's writing can occasionally be a little preaching and some may find the Christian apologies and Indian spirit a little much in parts.  The story is very worthy, and was clearly intended to offer the authors views on the value of love and friendship. It does both very well.

The story has many components, and some of them involve pretty serious and upsetting issues.

Read it at awesomedude

Issues, Envelopes, & Homophobes by phrineas flogg

Not so much a story as a record of letters and passed notes, the work may be 28 chapters long but is a pretty quick read.

Anthony has a compulsory pen pal as part of an English project and Lance is the "victim".

The exchanges that follow are entertaining and more that once had me laughing to myself. Well worth the short time it will take to read and pretty much guaranteed to make you smile.

Read it at fictionpress

The Incident at Red Bridge by CarlHoliday

Short as it is at seven chapters, this story covers a long period of time and a lot of emotion.

Buddy is abused by his father and confused about sex.  Life gets better for him, but the confusion never leaves.

The writing in this story is terrific.  The senses of fear and shame dominate Buddy and shape his perspective of every incident portrayed.  There is a strong sense throughout that something is not going to finish well.

Read it at gayauthors

Geeks by Paul Schroder

The writing is puerile, the characters mostly rather shallow and the plot tends to the improbable, and yet this twenty two chapter tale of paintball wars and shyness kept pulling me back in just when I was close to giving up on it.

Some of it is quite funny in a very boyish sort of a way, and some of the scenes of affection are very sweet.  The story has all the enthusiasm of a thirteen year old's writing, writing which seemed rather more British than American to me despite the setting. The main protagonists are a very young fourteen, but various brother and friends in the tale are younger.

Well if you like that kind of boyish nonsense (which I do in occasionally small doses) then this story is fun.

Read it at iomfats

Just Because by Ryette

The first story I read by this author was The Band Geeks Dictionary which I really enjoyed. "Just Because" is not a sequel but another story from Alpine Easy High School, although the band is barely mentioned in any of these 35 chapters.

Parker Daniels is sixteen, gay, out and not really very happy.  The story opens with Parker being bullied, again, by Alex who is a year older and seems to hate Parker. Well Alex's attitude does seem to change a little and eventually a sort of friendship is formed.  As Parker puts it...

"Sure, he's a dick to me on occasion, but he never calls me fag anymore. It's just Dipshit."

Ryette's writing is funny and romantic.  Most of the story is sweet, although both Alex and Parker have parental issues that Ryette handles well and left me thinking that Ryette could probably write something darker very well.  Perhaps she has! I haven't read all of hers.

Read it at fictionpress

The Ordinary Us by Dom Luka

Twenty five lengthy chapters explore the mind of seventeen year old Quinn as he moves from self loathing to self acceptance.

I like the way this story introduces Quinn, a boy with a girlfriend, well liked but knowing that he was unfulfilled.  The friends written into the story each allow the author to bring out different sides of the difficulties that Quinn has to overcome. The struggles are ones that many readers will have faced or are facing.  Quinn perhaps does not always deal with them either in the best way or very successfully, but he does learn.  Most importantly perhaps, he learns that everything cannot always finish up returning to how it was before, but that different can be as good and can be better.

Read it at ga

 

The Way You Say My Name by Sara Bell

As you start reading the 22 chapters of this story, you might think it will be of the familiar in the closet, teen angst style.  Well there is certainly a lot of that, but so much more besides.

The story develops into an enthralling tale of criminality and detective work as the mystery of a boy's past is unravelled.

The story is well written and builds to its unexpected finale well.  That the three boys at the centre of it all are gay is both crucial to the plot and almost unimportant.  Sara Bell tells their story because it is worth telling, not just because they are gay.

Read it at crvboy

or buy it at amazon

Book Worms by Josh BtomandBack

It is very difficult to write romantically about sex, to write heart warming erotica, but that is exactly what Josh does so successfully in this eight chapter gem of a story. Love and happiness shone through the characters all of whom are warmly and well portrayed from Adrian, the boy banned from football by his mother to Claudia, the gothic styled librarian and Rafael the "pretty boy".

Full of humour and very lively sex, the friendship these three weave in their roles as high school librarians make a touching , romantic and erecting read!

Read it at nifty